Feed On Feeds RSS Reader

The “Feed on Feeds” RSS Reader has just released a new version so I thought it would be a good time to highlight it. The reader can be found at http://minutillo.com/steve/feedonfeeds. While it is a bit rough around the edges, it is a great reader to monitor feeds from multiple locations without having to install software anywhere. It marks articles you’ve already read so that you don’t see it again at a new location. I use it to keep track of software releases at Sourceforge sites since it can be a pain to regularly keep track of multiple open-source software packages. A number of sites such as NewsIsFree offer common feeds like CNN and Foxnews. RSS is definitely the way of the future for distributing information via feeds rather than mailing lists, which are susceptible to spam. Its use in replacing general email and mailing lists at this time is questionable, however, as all readers do not yet organize articles in threads. While it is still new evolving technology based on xml, it is built on old ideas (remember PointCast?) and will take some time to find its niche among casual web surfers. For now, the benefit is that the data comes to you rather than having to repeatedly look at various websites for announcements. One glance at the RSS reader tells you whether or not you have any updated feeds. Most sites only allow updates once an hour, which is granular enough for most vendors and developer groups.

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One thought on “Feed On Feeds RSS Reader

  1. The “Feed on Feeds” RSS Reader has just released a new version so I thought it would be a good time to highlight it. The reader can be found at http://minutillo.com/steve/feedonfeeds. While it is a bit rough around the edges, it is a great reader to monitor feeds from multiple locations without having to install software anywhere. It marks articles you’ve already read so that you don’t see it again at a new location. I use it to keep track of software releases at Sourceforge sites since it can be a pain to regularly keep track of multiple open-source software packages. A number of sites such as NewsIsFree offer common feeds like CNN and Foxnews. RSS is definitely the way of the future for distributing information via feeds rather than mailing lists, which are susceptible to spam. Its use in replacing general email and mailing lists at this time is questionable, however, as all readers do not yet organize articles in threads. While it is still new evolving technology based on xml, it is built on old ideas (remember PointCast?) and will take some time to find its niche among casual web surfers. For now, the benefit is that the data comes to you rather than having to repeatedly look at various websites for announcements. One glance at the RSS reader tells you whether or not you have any updated feeds. Most sites only allow updates once an hour, which is granular enough for most vendors and developer groups.

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